What is this?

With two out of three trips on transit served by buses in Miami, the continued dismantling of the bus system is alarming and misguided.

Our 5-part series takes a deep dive into the state of our bus system.

Supported by:

  1. Ridership
  2. Service Cuts
  3. Reliability
  4. Route Network
  5. Solutions

Seen the problems?

Meet the solutions.

Our system needs wide-ranging reform. These solutions aim to transform our system to one that's built on data-driven decision-making, prioritizes reliability and ease of use, and offers a competitive advantage versus driving to attract riders.

Redesign the bus system

Goal

Create a more effective and usable system that's geared towards building ridership.

What

A systemwide process to reevaluate where (and how often) bus service should go, starting from a clean slate.

Why

Our system is rife with circuitous and inefficient routes, poorly designed connections, unmet demand, and corridors that warrant increased frequency.

How

Collaborate with Transit Alliance to hire an independent consultant to lead a data and community driven complete system redesign, the results of which must be adopted and implemented by set deadlines.

Best Practice

Similar cities taking action are performing better. Many have done redesigns, and a dozen more cities are planning them.

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Route Network
Service Cuts
Ridership

Add dedicated infrastructure

Goal

Make buses faster with on-street bus lanes and bus rapid transit corridors.

Why

Our buses can't compete when stuck in the same traffic commuters sought to avoid.

How

Highways: Create on-street bus lanes, starting with the MacArthur Causeway, which has the highest ridership of any corridor.

Main Roads: Build bus rapid transit, starting with Flagler St. and Biscayne Blvd., which have the highest riderships after the MacArthur.

Best Practice

Similar cities around the world have seen major successes with BRT. Stateside, Cleveland saw route ridership increase by 48% after introducing a dedicated lane.

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Route Network

Untangle the trolleys

Goal

Reevaluate neighborhood/municipality mobility to go beyond the "one size fits all" trolley.

Why

The adoption of trolleys have fragmented the overall transit system. Trolleys aren't always the most effective tool for short trips and last mile mobility.

How

Trolleys must be evaluated within the bus system redesign. They must complement - not compete with - county bus service.

Those that remain must be fully and smartly integrated, with planned connections, standardized hours and frequencies, and vehicles trackable in real-time on Google Maps and other transit apps.

Trolleys aren't always the answer - municipalities need to invest in protected cycling infrastructure, embrace dockless bike-sharing, and increase walkability to complement all transit services and facilitate short neighborhood trips that don't require any vehicle, transit or otherwise.

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Route Network
Ridership

Improve reliability

Goal

Make reliability mission-critical with defined data-driven goals to improve rider experience.

Why

Without creating holistically dependable service, every step taken to improve the system is for naught.

How

As the fleet is replaced, make it a top priority to reduce late/ghost buses (currently 500/700 per month), and greatly increase the number of bus stops that have shelter (currently only 25%).

Measure and publish performance metrics to inform continuous data-driven service improvements.

Last but not least, fix the real-time bus tracker.

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Reliability

When will this all happen?

You can help.

Our work doesn't end at proposing solutions, we are working to make them a reality.

We are beginning a dialogue with legislative bodies and department leaders to determine accurate timeframes and set defined goals. We will update this page once we have more information.

As we begin our advocacy, send an an e-mail to your commissioner, asking them to support our solutions. It can be as simple as "I support Transit Alliance's solutions for the bus system" with a link to this page.


Newsletter

Disclaimer: Although the analysis presented by Transit Alliance has been produced from sources believed to be reliable, Transit Alliance makes no warranty or claims as to the accuracy of said data or the resulting analysis. It is often necessary to manually compile and reformat the data for presentation, and determine guidelines and assumptions to appropriately represent trends. We welcome corrections, please e-mail us at help (at) transitalliance.miami